Research

Reseach Name
Director of Research

Solomon Zahava

About As part of the I-CORE for Mass Trauma Research, a collaborative multi-disciplinary study on the long-term effects of combat and war captivity has been launched. This represents a collaboration of I-CORE scientists from Tel Aviv University (Professor Zahava Solomon), Hebrew University (Professor Mona Soreq), Weisman Institute (Professor Alon Chen), Bar Ilan University (Professor Rachel Dekel) and IDC (Professor Mario Mikulincer). The study examines (1) the long-term biopsychosocial effects (i.e., PTSD, depression, social functioning, morbidity and mortality); (2) Risk factors implicated in vulnerability; (3) biopsychosocial factors that increase resilience and promote recovery.
This project is based on a 24 year longitudinal study of former prisoners of war (ex-POWs) of the Yom Kippur War and comparable combat veterans who were not held captive. This cohort has been assessed at three points of time by Professor Solomon and the 4th wave of measurement that is currently underway was expanded to include systematic medical check-ups and a wide range of biological markers (i.e., micro RNA, telomeres, cognition). This unique study also includes spouses and adult offspring of ex-POWs and combat veterans. This initial stage of the study let to the establishment of the Israeli Association of Former Prisoners of War ("Erim Balaya", meaning "Awake at Night" in Hebrew). The association, in turn, has a long-term strong collaboration with the researchers.
Publications of this project can be found:
Reseach Name
Director of Research

Solomon Zahava

About Since the year 2000, the residents of the areas located along the southern Israeli border with Gaza suffer from thousands of ongoing rocket attacks. Initially, the bombing was directed only towards the city of Sderot. After the 2005 Israeli disengagement from Gaza, several military operations have taken place between Israel and Hamas forces and during this time the Israeli population has suffered from increased rocket fire as well as an expansion of the rocket firing range to include numerous outlying communities, including surrounding kibbutz and communal settlements. For the first several years of the attacks, these communities were without proper shelters and suffered from attacks on a daily basis, which significantly disturbed the quality and day-to-day life of the individuals living exposed on the front line. Research among both children and adults in this area, has shown increased distress and a high rate of posttraumatic stress symptoms as well as functional impairments, along with regressive behavior seen among children.
In light of the complicated reality, the questions concerning the mental and physical health of the residents in this area have become not only an academic issue but also a pragmatic issue that demands practical solutions. Together, the Israel Trauma Coalition (ITC), the National Insurance Institute of Israel and the I-CORE initiated an umbrella project in order to evaluate: (1) the psychological needs of the residents, both children and adults, targeting both clinical and community samples and (2) the efficiency of the treatment and services that are offered.